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Capitalism's grow-or-die imperative stands radically at odds with ecology's imperative of interdependence and limit. The two imperatives can no longer coexist with each other; nor can any society founded on the myth that they can be reconciled hope to survive. Either we will establish an ecological society or society will go under for everyone, irrespective of his or her status.

Ursla Le Guin (1929-2018)

On the Future of the Left, Motherboard, February 4, 2015)

Whose Shoe?

Choice Card: Whose Shoe?
Target:
yours, mine
Age:
kindergarten aged and up
Duration:
depends on class size
Class Size:
any
Energy Level:
moderate
Type:
claiming activity
Equipment:
shoes and a basket to put them in
humour
feet
guessing
pronouns

This rather silly activity has a serious language purpose - to encourage understanding of possesive pronouns. It is very simple. One person, usually the teacher gathers one shoe from each person present. The shoes are put in a basket and taken out one at a time and returned to their rightful owners. That's it!

Typical dialogue might be:

Teacher: Your shoe?

Student A: No!

Teacher: Your shoe?

Student B: Yes!

Usually I've done this activity in places where students remove their outdoor shoes before entering the room. I always include one of my own shoes. I like to see if anyone can work out the reply "Your shoe!" when I try to give away my own shoe.

When I do this activity I focus on the concept of possession rather than trying to elicit full sentences. I think that producing full sentences without full understanding is more or less meaningless. I feel that children especially, gain nothing from being forced to use full sentences. I think it can lead to confusion.

It's best to avoid this game on inclement days. Where muddy shoes hold sway

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